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Please Don’t Recycle Local Variables

I think there’s a lot of value to the conservation angle of the green movement. In general, it’s a matter of efficiency–if you can heat/light/whatever your house with the same quality of life, using less energy and fewer resources, that’s a win for everyone. This applies to a whole lot of things beyond just eco-concerns, however. Conserving heat when you’re cold, conserving energy when you’re running a marathon, conserving your dollars when making a budget–all good ideas. Cut down, conserve, reuse when you can.

Recycle

Except please don’t do it with your local variables. For example:

Here, we initialize a local variable, count, and use it to keep track of the results of some processing of customers. When we’re done, we reset count and use it to keep track of the apparently unrelated concept of machines. What I’m saying is that there shouldn’t be just one count, but rather customerCount and machineCount.

Does this seem like nitpicking? You could certainly make that argument, but this code is not going to age well. First of all, this method should clearly be two methods, so we’re starting right off the bat with a bit of technical debt. It would be cleaner if each loop had its own method.

But an interesting thing happens if we use the refactoring tools to try to do that–the refactoring tool wants return values or input parameters. Yikes, that was unexpected, so we just move on. Later, when the time comes to iterate over movies, we see that there’s a ‘design pattern’ in place, so we modify the code to look like this:

Now this thing should really be split up, so we start selecting parts of it to see what we can refactor. Ew, now we’re getting ref parameters to boot. This thing is getting even more painful to try to refactor, and we’re in a hurry, so no time for that. And to make matters worse, if you add in a few other aggregator variables this way, you’ll start to have all kinds of barriers in place when you want to pull this thing apart, such as crazy sets of out parameters. I’ve posted before about how I feel about ref and out.

All of this mounting technical debt could easily be avoided by giving each loop its own count variable. Having them recycle the same one creates a compile-time dependency of what’s going on in each loop with what happened in the loop before, even though there are no other similar dependencies in evidence. In other words, recycling this local variable is the only thing that’s creating a coupling in your code–there’s no logical reason to do it.

This is the height of procedural programming and baking in temporal dependencies that I cautioned you to avoid here. It’s a completely useless dependency that will inhibit refactoring and dirty up your code in a hurry. It may not seem like much yet, but this will be a huge pain point later as the lines of code in this method balloon from the dozens to the hundreds, and you rely heavily on automated tools to help with cleanup. Flag variables used over and over in sequence throughout a method are like pebbles in your shoe when you’re trying to refactor.

So my advice is to avoid this practice completely. There’s really no advantage to coding this way and the potential downside is enormous.